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Dr Selwyn Cudjoe

The Slave Master of Trinidad by Dr. Selwyn R. Cudjoe
The Slave Master of Trinidad by Dr. Selwyn R. Cudjoe


Indian Time Ah Come by Dr. Selwyn R. Cudjoe
Indian Time Ah Come by Dr. Selwyn R. Cudjoe


Caribbean Visionary: A. R. F. Webber and the Making of the Guyanese Nation by Dr. Selwyn R. Cudjoe
Caribbean Visionary: A. R. F. Webber and the Making of the Guyanese Nation by Dr. Selwyn R. Cudjoe


RUPERTA Tale in Black and White GRAY
The new edition of the novel published by Calaloux Publications RUPERTA Tale in Black and White GRAY by Stephen Nathaniel Cobham [PDF]
The Cudjoe Collection of Trinidad and Tobago Literature With an Introduction by Selwyn R. Cudjoe

Dr. Selwyn R. Cudjoe is a professor of Literature at
Wellesley College


Identity and Caribbean Literature
A lecture delivered to the Japanese Black Studies
Association at Nara Women's College, Nara, Japan.


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African Timeline

Ancient Man


C. L. R. James:
His Intellectual Legacies


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Graduating in the Age of Coronavirus and Police Brutality June 02, 2020
May 30, 2020: Remarks at Wellesley's Virtual Graduation Ceremony, Harambee House Full Article

Letter to My Grandson June 01, 2020
I write to you at what is supposed to be a happy time although it is tinged with sadness. The happiness first.
You have spent seventeen years preparing for your graduation day. It is a time to celebrate with your parents and your friends, your teachers and loved ones, after years of hard work and dedication. You have been to summer camps—you even had a stint at one of the leading technology companies in the country—as you strove to carve out a space to begin your new adventure in college and to think about what you want to do after you graduate from college. Full Article

The Lie... May 25, 2020
About five years ago several Eric Williams scholars were invited to investigate Eric Williams's work at Oxford University before continuing on to Senate House, London. Brinsley Samaroo, one of the invited scholars, gave an illuminating lecture on Williams after which I asked him whether Williams had called Indo-Trinidadians, rather than a segment of members of the Democratic Labor Party, "a recalcitrant hostile minority." His answer was an emphatic "No. He did not." Full Article

Young's tragic blunder May 18, 2020
I thought the expeditious manner in which the Prime Minister and his party handled the coronavirus pandemic rescued their fortunes and gave their supporters reason to believe the PNM would focus on the needs of ordinary people, albeit by circumstances rather than by choice. Full Article

The Lie... May 11, 2020
I was stunned but not surprised by Roodal Moonilal's letter to Joseph Mondello, US Ambassador to T&T, asking the US government to act against the best interest of our homeland. His lame excuse, a mea culpa perhaps, was: "If the United States imposes no sanctions against Trinidad and Tobago it will be because of the action of the United National Congress" (Express, May 5). As Mondello asserted, the US does not need Moonilal to tell it where its interests lies. Full Article

Re-charting our Ruins May 04, 2020
Fifty eight years ago Eric Williams (PNM) and Rudranath Capildeo (DLP/UNC) went to Marlborough House to discuss the path forward to create an independent nation. Williams was determined to take the country into independence while Capildeo wanted to make sure that Afro-Trinbagonians, the majority group, did not discriminate against Indo-Trinbagonians. Subsuming their party interests to the national interest, they inscribed a minority platform into the country's constitution that protected the rights of Indo-Trinbagonians and other ethnic groups. Full Article

In Defense of Teachers April 29, 2020
Alberta Smith (not her real name), my dear friend, has been a primary school teacher for thirty years. She didn't like last week's article and didn't put water in her mouth to tell me so. She sent the following response which I was free to reproduce once I omitted her real name. She wrote: Full Article

"All Ah We in This Together..." April 20, 2020
As a teacher, I was interested in the exchange between Anthony Garcia, the minister of education (MOE), and Antonia De Freitas, president of the TTUTA, with regard to how best to continue teaching our nation's pupils while schools are closed because of the coronavirus pandemic. The MOE wanted to "determine the extent to which students had access to learning materials while schools were closed" (Newsday, April 11) so it could determine the best platform to deliver online teaching for our pupils. Full Article

Black Betrayal (In the Age of the Coronavirus) April 13, 2020
I have been writing about the plight of black people in Trinidad and Tobago for a while. Like Marvin Gaye, sometimes it "make me wanna holler/The way they do my life" ("Inner City Blues"). I have argued that we will never solve black impoverishment unless we see it as a national problem that demands the same resolve that we brought to combat the coronavirus pandemic. Full Article

My Spiritual Inheritance April 06, 2020
During the late 1940s and early 1950s, early on Sunday mornings, we would hear the bells ringing out loudly in the street as a band of women, dressed immaculately in white with varied colored head ties proceeded to the Tacarigua River to conduct their religious rituals. At the tender age of six or seven I did not know what such celebrations (I saw it as a celebration) were about. All I knew was that my Tantie Lenora was among that band of women. Somehow, I felt embarrassed or even ashamed. Full Article

Black Betrayal, Or God Don't Like Ugly March 31, 2020
In response to my column of three weeks ago, "Black Betrayal," a critic attacked me in a slanderous manner. Mercifully, the Express deleted the more vitriolic aspects of his original letter. He claimed I invented Aaron St. John to carry on my nefarious agenda. Full Article

Surrendering ME for the WE March 24, 2020
I am not a particularly religious man (spiritual is a better adjective to describe my theological persuasion), so I do not believe that God sent the coronavirus to teach us a lesson. However, we can learn a lot from our present challenges.
Full Article


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